7 things you can do if you’re tired all the time

 

7 things you can do if you’re tired all the time

“Fatigue can be described as a lack of energy and motivation (both physical and mental). This is different from drowsiness, a term that describes the need to sleep … Fatigue is a very common complaint and it is important to remember that it is a symptom and not a disease “– MedicineNet.

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Fatigue happens to everyone, but especially as we get older. Most people complain of feeling “exhausted”, “burned”, “overworked”, etc. Many of these people are dealing with an increase in episodes of fatigue. The good news is that we can counteract this dreaded feeling of tiredness. All it takes is a little knowledge and willpower – and maybe a cup of coffee.

HERE ARE 7 THINGS TO DO IF YOU ARE TIRED ALL THE TIME

1. REQUEST A MEDICAL CHECK
Do you regularly receive an annual medical check-up – a complete wellness test? Health screenings and tests can detect problems before they start. In case there is a problem, the doctor can prescribe a treatment regimen.

Fatigue can be a symptom of an underlying medical condition. A physical examination is necessary to determine this.

Duke Health – a medical institute at Duke University – recommends the following for each age group:

Under 30 years: a checkup every two or three years. Sexually active women, at the age of 21, should schedule a Pap test.
Between 30 and 40 years: a physical examination every two years. Reference mammograms are recommended for women who are 40 years old.
50 years or older: an annual physical examination. Men and women should schedule a colonoscopy at age 50 and, in most cases, reschedule it every 10 years.

2. PUT YOUR BODY IN MOTION
Exercise is often the last thing on the mind of someone who feels fatigued. However, numerous studies have concluded that routine exercise is effective in increasing energy levels.

Kerry J. Steward, a professor of medicine and director of clinical and research physiology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says:

“The exercise has been consistently related to the improvement of vigor and quality of life in general. People who become active have a greater sense of self-confidence. But exercise also improves the working efficiency of your heart, lungs, and muscles … (is) the equivalent of improving a car’s fuel efficiency. It gives you more energy for any type of activity. “

 

3. HYDRATION, HYDRATION, HYDRATION
Dehydration is when the body expels more fluids than it consumes; it is a condition that is mentally and physically exhausting. Sweating, urinating and even breathing causes the loss of water.

Drinking water frequently during the day mitigates feelings of fatigue, as well as increases our mental alertness and concentration. Try to drink at least 2/3 liters of water per day.

 

4. HAVE A REGULAR SLEEP REGIME
Inadequate and irregular sleep patterns not only contribute to fatigue but also increase the risk of accidents and injuries.

Experts recommend going to bed early enough to ensure a good night’s sleep. For a healthy adult, the Mayo Clinic recommends 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Sleeping 10 to 30 minutes during the midday is also a great habit to keep fatigue at bay.

Also, try to get used to going to bed and waking up at the same time every day.

 

5. GET SOMETHING FROM OMEGA-3
Omega-3 fish oil, in addition to being good for heart health, can increase mental alertness and combat fatigue. There are many ways to get Omega-3s: fatty fish (eg, halibut, herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines, tuna), flax seeds and nuts.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a daily intake of 0.3 to 0.5 grams and a daily intake of 0.8 to 1.1 grams of ALA. Although it is advised to consume Omega-3 through food, high-quality supplements are also available in the market.

 

6. EAT REGULARLY
The notion that eating 5 to 6 small meals during the day instead of 3 larger meals has been a topic of discussion among the health community. Certain demographic data, such as bodybuilders and athletes, often adhere to the 5-6 meal regimen. Most of us stick to the traditional 3-meal schedule.

Regardless of your preference, protecting yourself from fatigue requires adequate levels of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients in the body throughout the day.

Eating healthy foods, such as whole grains and complex carbohydrates, can help regulate blood sugar levels. It is a good idea to have some snacks on hand in case feelings of fatigue begin to appear.

 

7. KNOW YOUR BODY CLOCK
Understanding our circadian rhythm, the body’s 24-hour “physiological clock”, can have a positive impact on our energy levels. Some people love mornings, and they get that “extra boost” to do things; Some people are “nocturnal owls”, and are more productive at night.

You probably know which of the two groups you’re in. Use this knowledge to your advantage by scheduling the most demanding tasks accordingly, which will prevent fatigue from being placed at the wrong time.

 
  Disclaimer: All content on this website is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this website and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always consult with your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.