Dangerous Opioids: How Painkillers Affect The Body

 

Dangerous Opioids: How Painkillers Affect The Body

Chronic pain is one of the most common conditions, as it affects over 100 million Americans. It can affect everything from your ability to move to how well you can enjoy your life.

The problem with pain is that it tends to be treated by opioids. These drugs interact with the nervous system and the brain to reduce the sensation of pain. While they can be effective, they can also have grave side effects. Let’s explore how pain killers affect the body to better understand why they are so dangerous.

Painkillers Affect The Body

Affecting the Nervous System
There are two primary ways opioids work: affecting nerve receptors, and influencing the way the brain works.

Opioids affect the nerve receptors by attaching to them. They block the transmission of pain, which in turn limits the amount of pain that a person feels. They primarily attach to the receptors in the spine, intestines and other organs, which in turn is what makes them effective for stopping the pain.

-They block the transmission of pain, which in turn limits the amount of pain that a person feels. They primarily attach to the receptors in the spine, intestines and other organs, which in turn is what makes them effective for stopping the pain.

-They influence the brain by changing the brain’s chemistry. This alters the way you experience any remaining pain, which is why people may feel a sensation of euphoria when taking opioids.

Damaging the Organs
Opioids interfere with the nervous system’s ability to function. While this may be advantageous in terms of pain management, it can be disastrous when the organs are affected.

RELATED ARTICLE: 9 Alternative Ways To Relieve Your Pain Without Ibuprofen/NSAIDs

Prolonged usage of opioids can affect the organs in the following ways:

-The kidneys may experience failure, and the bladder may retain more urine than it should. This could lead to pain and urinary tract infections.
-The respiratory system will slow over time. Users may find it difficult to breathe.
-Hormonal changes can occur in the body. This can lower a person’s sex drive, decrease fertility and result in emotional changes.
-Constipation, diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal conditions may develop. If left unchecked, these could develop into malnutrition, polyps, and sepsis of the blood.

Changing How You Think
One pronounced effect of opioids is their ability to alter your thought process. You may make decisions that you would not otherwise when taking opioids.

Some of the decisions you make while under the influence of these prescription painkillers may be dangerous or illegal. Drug crime defense attorneys can help you defend yourself if you experience legal troubles because of opioid use.

A Growing Dependency
As a person continues to take opioids, several changes occur within the body. The most prominent of these changes is a growing dependence upon these drugs. The body changes in a way that requires them. People who abruptly stop taking opioids will experience the symptoms of withdrawal, which can range from increased irritability to crippling pain. As the body remains free from the influence of opioids, it will slowly recover and become less dependent on them.
Minimizing the Damage of Opioids
The best way to prevent the effects of opioids is to stop using them. You can seek medical help if your body has developed a dependence on these drugs, just as you can find legal aid to minimize the effect of these dangerous painkillers on your life.

Painmed.org

 
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