This Is What Happens During $ex In The Human Body

 

This Is What Happens During $ex In The Human Body

Lovemaking is an act that can often occur quite fast and without much thought of the process. A video recently released by Vox has changed the way many people see the act of lovemaking. By using an MRI machine, the masterminds behind the video have shown just how the often seemingly complicated act of lovemaking is actually quite simple. Because the video strips the participants to brain activity, blood flow, and muscle movement, we can see in an exaggerated format, the simplicity of the five phases.

Phase One, Stimulation
The first phase of lovemaking is marked by several physical responses. Muscles begin to tense, the heart rate becomes elevated and the skin reddens as the blood moves around the body and enters the brain. Certain body parts in both the male and the female begin to swell, including the breasts, the labia, and the penis. Both the male and female nipples harden. Both the male and female organs begin to lubricate to allow comfortable penetration. This is the stage that is often associated with foreplay and arousal that allows the body to physically ready itself for the act of lovemaking and the next four stages.

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During Sex

Phase Two, Plateau
The second phase is extremely similar to the first; however, in this phase all the physical responses of the first phase are heightened. Breathing rates continue to soar, and the body continues to become tenser and tenser until the climax. Both the male and female organs become ultra-sensitive, and they keep swelling. The blood continues flowing throughout the body, turning certain organs from a flushed red color to purple. The female and male organs are so sensitive the start to retract to avoid direct contact and stimulation.

Phase Two, Plateau

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Phase Three, Female Orgasm
Though the orgasm stage is the shortest of all the stages, it is often the most desired stage. The female orgasm is marked by high blood pressure, the continual flow of blood to the organs and the increased redness in the skin. The body tenses dramatically before relaxing. Muscle spasms begin that are completely involuntary. Both the vagina and the uterus begin rhythmic contractions, resulting in the release of tension and pressure from the body. After the climax, increased blood flow results in a redness in the skin similar to a rash. Women may or may not experience ejaculation at this phase. Some women are able to achieve multiple orgasms, so this phase may seem longer to some women than others.

Stage 3

Phase Four, Male Orgasm
The male orgasm, similar to the female orgasm, results in the release of pressure throughout the body. The muscles become extremely tense before relaxing completely. The muscles in the feet may begin to contract the muscles at the base of the male organs. Once involuntary contractions begin, the male will ejaculate semen. Blood continues to travel throughout the body at an accelerated rate, causing the skin to appear red and flushed. A rash may also appear at this stage. For men, the orgasm stage will only last a few seconds at most.

Male Orgasm

Phase Five, Recovery
In the last phase of lovemaking, the body readies itself to return to a natural, resting state. Both the male and female organs shrink down in size. The blood flow steadies throughout the body, allowing the skin and organs to return to a regular color. As long as no further stimulation occurs, the breathing will return to a normal rate. Women may enter the phase of orgasm again at this stage, but men will inevitably need a recovery time before stimulation will feel comfortable again. Chemicals enter the brain that stimulate a sense of euphoria or happiness.

Though lovemaking can seem like one of the most complicated processes in our lives, its simplicity is quite fascinating. By stripping down the process into five stages, we can visualize the entire process and understand the physical responses to stimulation and their relationship to our mental responses.

Webmd.com   Medicinenet.com

 
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